Browsing Tag

Sara Cornell

— Life —

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Like many women, I suppose, when I was a Mrs, it was my job to run the house and run the kids and run all over the place, and it was my husband’s job to earn the money and to pay the bills. It was not for lack of understanding (perhaps more for lack of time), but I was not involved in many financial decisions. Whether it was through blind faith or chronic fatigue, I can’t say, but the financial engine chugged along without much engagement on my part. Upon entering the kingdom of singledom, many financial decisions that I had heretofore ignored, suddenly became paramount. Continue Reading

— Relationships —

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Recently a friend told me that she was having an affair. Not long after that, another friend, after a few too many glasses of wine, told me she was living in an emotional and financial house of cards, just waiting for her life to implode. Over and above the immediate concern I had, for my friends, was the feeling of discord and awkwardness that permeated my psyche. I felt like I was privy to too much information and could no longer be objectively neutral in their presence. The problem was (is,) I am equally attached to both friends AND their spouses, and feel vested in the happiness and success of both parties. How do you have a meaningful, or even a superficial conversation with someone when you know a deep secret about them? Continue Reading

— Life —

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A friend of my parents passed away last week. A customer had left an opened and half-read newspaper on the counter at Starbucks, and while I waited for my latte, I began to casually scroll down the names in the obituary column with detached non-interest. My mind-brake slammed on when I came to the familiar name in the latter half of the alphabet.  Dad and Dr. S were colleagues and friends. They belonged to the same professional and social organizations, and for many years enjoyed a weekly game of squash. I knew his children. My mother and Mrs. S played tennis together and were on the same volunteer committees.  Twenty some years ago, when I had a back injury, Dr. S took care of me. He gave me good care, good advice, a prescription and sent me on my way. I haven’t seen Dr. S since then, and only thought of him and his family on occasion in the years since.

His obituary is on my kitchen counter – a reminder that I should write a note to his family expressing my condolences. But every time I walk through the kitchen and catch a glimpse of the notice, or reach for some note paper, my throat clenches, and I am momentarily stopped with the effort to fight back tears. Continue Reading

— Life —

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For going on two decades, yoga as been not only my work-out but also my work-in. There was a moment many years ago, having suffered through an insufferable and idiotic sermon at church, that I subsequently went to yoga class and was awestruck by the soothing words, calm message, and universal thinking that accompanied the ancient practice. From that point on, the yoga shala has been the place I turn to for physical and emotional development and healing. That’s not to say that all yoga practices are – our should be – spiritual in form or delivery, but I think that many practiced yogis find a strong connection with what is going on in their head and their hearts manifested in their physical asana practice.

For some people, church or temple is their sanctuary. For others it’s drugs or alcohol. For me, when the going gets tough, I go to yoga. Continue Reading

— Life —

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En route for an early walk at the dog park, my phone buzzed with a new message. Opening the email, I felt my mind and body pause for a moment, stunned in reflection.

“Sara,” it read, “Last year you ordered a gift for Elizabeth. At the time you indicated this was a Birthday. As a courtesy, we’re reminding you that the 13th is approaching. We’d love the opportunity to again give something special on your behalf.”

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— Relationships —

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As a child I was raised on a steady diet of true love. My parents, as far as I could tell, were happily married, and even if communication were somewhat lacking in our household, the books and novels that enthralled me for hours were full of meaningful romance and relationships that stood the test of time. As such, when I began to navigate adulthood and adult relationships, I somehow expected I would find “The One.” The one person who met every emotional, physical, spiritual, financial, sexual, intellectual, and hypothetical criteria or need I had–or might have–over the course of my entire life. This person would be my soul mate; my destiny; my true love, and we would weather the tests of time, together, tightly bound in our cocoon of One-ness.

After all, that’s how it happened in the books and movies I devoured.

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