Browsing Tag

Dr. Barbara Bergin

— Life —

Scarlett and Mammy in 'Gone With the Wind'
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How did we ever reach bras with fasteners in the back? We didn’t reach blouses with buttons in the back. Were the hooks and eyes in the back of the brassiere some kind of sadistic, puritanical design, the purpose of which was to make it harder for men to undo them? Was it to exercise and stretch out the muscles of our chests, or was it just a simple holdover from the days of corsets which laced in the back? Continue Reading

— Life —

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There’s an organized group of walkers where my folks live that requires all participants use walking sticks or hiking poles, simply because they lessen the likelihood of falling. They’re lightweight aluminum, collapsible and sporty looking, so it doesn’t look like you’re using canes. In general, older folks are reluctant to use canes because it makes them look… old. I decided to try them out, and here are my findings and opinions, regarding walking sticks. Continue Reading

— Life —

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I often refer back to cavemen when I try to ponder the human condition. If you’d been a cavewoman, you would have rarely gotten a solid six hours of sleep. The average primitive human life was only 20 years. During that time, you’d almost certainly have babies at your side–and your breast–plus everything was out to get you and your babies: weather, things that fall or roll, animals, even other humans. You would have slept with one eye open because at any moment you might have to get up, grab your kids and RUN! Continue Reading

— Life —

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Check out J.J. Watt’s bat wings. (J.J. Watt, defensive end for the Houston Texans.) Why doesn’t he DO something about those? Look at that sagging flesh. It looks just like yours when you wave, doesn’t it? Continue Reading

— Life —

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I was working on a bone and joint blog–my area of expertise–when I saw Sara Cornell’s story on 1010ParkPlace about her heart attack. So, I put on my generalist cap, and more importantly my mommy cap, and remembered that this month is the 10 year anniversary of my son’s sudden cardiac arrest on a football field in College Station, Texas. There was nothing we could have done to prevent it, just as there was nothing Sara could have done to prevent her heart attack. Fortunately Sara didn’t go into sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), a deadly situation in which the heart stops pumping blood.

But that’s exactly what happened to my son.

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